Still Deliberating

The jury in Raymond Jeasop’s trial began deliberating on punishment about 11:45 this morning. They are still deliberating.

It does not surprise me that deliberations at this phase are taking longer than guilt/innocence deliberations. Punishment is not as black and white — there is an expansive range of options, and the decision has to be unanimous.

The jury can hang on punishment.

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~ by FLDS TEXAS on November 10, 2009.

37 Responses to “Still Deliberating”

  1. I suppose, but it seems pretty clear cut to me!

  2. DD1, it seems clear cut to you and me because we have immersed ourselves in this group and this case. The average person hasn’t.

  3. But those cabinets he built were so nice, he can’t be a bad man!

  4. HAHAHAHA Betty!!!

  5. I still can’t believe that Stevens said “We have no quarrel with your verdict,” he said. “We respect your verdict.” If there’s no quarrel with the verdict then there should be no appeal.

  6. Stevens was filling the jury full of bull crap ProudTexan!1

  7. Brooke Adams has a picture of Stephanie Sinclair who is a photo journalist for National Geographic, Marie Claire Magazine, she is in El Dorado covering the trial..
    I looked her up, this is a story she did on Afghanstan women and how oppresive patriarchical societies are.
    http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/flash_point/afghanistan/interview.html

  8. Stephanie Sinclair isn’t at all ambiguous, is she? It will be interesting to see what she ends up doing with this FLDS story.

    Great find, Deputy Dog!

  9. I’m still stuck on the guy who hired Raymond to build a house for him, who testified, “Raymond made me a better man.”

    I’ve had contractors make me a better kitchen, or better garage doors, but never a better man.

    Maybe he meant to say, “Raymond made me a man,” which would mean something else entirely.

  10. ProudTexas

    An appeal isn’t really a “quarrel” with the verdict. It’s really more a quarrel with the process. You actually need show that a particular error actually lead to the verdict. Otherwise it’s what’s known as “harmless” error.

    So, Stevens is not really being disingenuous.

  11. I asked around and I know one of the witnesses who testified. The FLDS built a really big house for them out in the Wall area and the reason why they got the contract was they were much cheaper on the bid than other places. I asked and he said there were some pretty young workers, but that they all worked hard. Wonder if Raymond’s 12 year old son was on the work crew.

  12. what happens if the jury gets hung on the punishment?

  13. They get sent to their room without supper.

  14. what happens if the jury gets hung on the punishment?

    It doesn’t affect the finding of guilt. A mistrial is declared in the punishment phase and a new jury must be empaneled to decide punishment.

  15. I made a quick search of the internet and the fed prohibits anyone under 16 from working on a construction site at all. But I’m assuming that’s working for pay. Not sure of the legality of hanging around with dad and carrying 2×4’s and not getting paid.

  16. Yeah, Greetings and that too – actually the Judge could use that to try to keep them from getting hung.

  17. Yes the witnesses said he brought young kids with him to work on the house, they even went swimnming and fishing in the tank the man owned… Im sorry but a construction site is NO place for young kids, and if one had gotten hurt,, there would of been LOTS of trouble!

  18. I’m thinking that being tired and hungry could motivate the stragglers to come around. (I think the majority probably wants a maximum penalty or close to it.

    But I got thinking about Warren Jeffs’ trial and I seem to remember that the jury was out a long time and I was sure that meant acquittal. Makes me think there isn’t much to be gained by fretting.

  19. Well Chapter 51 of the labor code doesn’t apply to a child

    employed:

    1. in a non-hazardous occupation;
    2. under the direct supervision of the child’s parent or an adult having custody of the child; and
    3. in a business or enterprise owned or operated by the parent or custodian.

    There is also the problem of the definition of a construction site. Building or remodeling a home is far different than building a multi-story office building.

  20. Greetings

    Not that it will make much difference to the pro FLDS folks, but you want a jury to spend a lot of time debating punishment. It means you have obviously a diversity of opinions that need to be sorted out.

    Personally, I just felt with the evidence of helping an interstate fugitive, the evidence of multiple underage wives, and the testimony of him being deeply involved in FLDS matters that it would have been a much shorter deliberation.

  21. So did I Ron! Evidently they have taken Raymond back into the courtroom

  22. Good point, Ron. I wouldn’t want a kid anywhere near a commercial building site. I worked construction myself for 7 years. But I can see how building a home might be very different.

    I had my roof redone a few years ago. I swear the people who did it were Irish Travellers, although I went through a general contractor. They were from Georgia. They pulled up at 6:30 AM with a van and two trucks and then adults and children started getting out like clowns out of a VW beetle. Mom opened the back of the van and had a kitchen set up and started making breakfast. The whole family worked, even kids in the range of 12 or so. The younger kids were tended by one of the teens as Mom was on the roof most of the day. They worked like crazy for two days, left the yard clean of nails or trash and took off, saying they had another job to go to. One guy said he worked on my roof when it was put in the first time, 35 years ago, and he had some details that made me think he was right. Yes, school was in session and the kids weren’t in school. They looked like post cards of Ireland, red hair and all. I worried about the kids, but didn’t do anything about it.

  23. Well this week ive managed to bite all my fingernails down to the quick,, LOL
    Guess my OCD kicks in cases like this

  24. Ron, why would Raymond Jessop have been escorted back into court 45 minutes ago except to hear the verdict?

  25. We just had our house reroofed, the crew was Mexican, like most roofing crews in this area, and they did a great job.

    This was while school was in session, I would have fired them immediately if their kids had been hanging around the whole time they were here, kids should be in school not on a job site.

  26. Greetings

    Could have been another request or question from the jury. He is entitled to be present for those also.

  27. Winslow just twittered:

    Something’s happening at the courthouse. Will keep you updated.

    I kinda miss the old days, where we just waited for the morning paper.

  28. CRAP!!!

    BREAKING NEWS: Raymond Jessop, FLDS member, gets 10 yrs and $8,000 fine!

  29. “10 years without consideration of probation”

  30. BREAKING NEWS: Raymond Jessop, FLDS member, gets 10 yrs and $8,000 fine!

  31. Well at least no probation and hopefully he serves every second of the 10 years!

  32. LOL GFNY, Great minds!

  33. Yeah, I’ve been hitting that refresh button right along with you, Sadie.

  34. 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 10, 2009
    Jessop gets 10 years…no probation
    A Schleicher County jury just sentenced Raymond Merril Jessop to 10 years in state prison and an $8,000 fine. There will be no probation. The jury reached the verdict after deliberating more than six hours.

    Under Texas law, Jessop must serve half of the sentence before he is eligible for parole.

  35. El Dorado Success

  36. http://www.myeldorado.net/

  37. I assume in Texas parole means supervised release after some part of the sentence has been served, and probation is imposed in lieu of incarceration.

    So I read this to mean he serves at least five years and is then eligible for parole. I don’t know how likely he is to be paroled, since I don’t live in Texas, but if he only serves five years, it is a scant sentence.

    But the jury has spoken, and there it is.

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