Judge Tullar’s Remarks to Defendants 1953

Tullar

The romantic concept of a boy and girl falling in love, deciding upon marriage, facing life with its joys and sorrow hand in hand is not just material for the poets.  To force a young girl not yet competent to think or speak for herself into a plural marriage with a man not of her heart’s choosing, is to force her into bondage.

To say that a 15-year-old girl who marries a 30, 40, 50-year-old man, selected for her by a committee of other men, does so voluntarily and without force or duress is merely to quibble with words.   Our law wisely decrees that a child of such age is incompetent to make any voluntary decisions such as that.

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~ by FLDS TEXAS on July 3, 2009.

6 Responses to “Judge Tullar’s Remarks to Defendants 1953”

  1. Thanks FLDS Texas!

    What a powerful document in light of what is happening on so many levels.

    I think Utah politics keeps the crime of polygamy alive even today on many levels, local and national.

    This head of the snake needs to be chopped off somehow.

  2. He let the men go, on the word, on their honor.

    Those men had no honor but to lie for their “lord”.

  3. It all sounds depressingly familiar, except for this:

    “Although fanaticism flourishes in ignorance, I find among you gentlemen keen intelligence, extensive formal education, broad travel, sophisticated outlook, heroic service to your country, pleasant personality, industry, humor and. optimism…”

    There is no way a man like Wee Willie can be described in these terms.

  4. plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose

  5. Aint that the truth. The similarities are startling, right down to the kids being returned to their parents. I think the judge’s comments about the defendants’ honor and redeeming qualities is important — it is that perception, widely held in the public, that allows them to continue to perpetrate crimes and abuses without consequence. The average Joe on the street meets or interacts with an FLDS person … or sees them on TV or reads about some members on the internet, and Joe Public cannot reconcile in his mind his perception of the kind, well-groomed and well-mannered FLDS person with ongoing criminal activity and abuses. It’s a bit of cognitive dissonance, the limitations on human understanding and experience makes it difficult for the average person to think of FLDS members as criminals of the highest order.

    It is all about perception, and I hope that trend has stopped. I would like the lawbreakers to reap the consequences of their criminal acts.

  6. “It’s a bit of cognitive dissonance, the limitations on human understanding and experience makes it difficult for the average person to think of FLDS members as criminals of the highest order.”

    Why should I regard most FLDS members who have clean backgrounds and not under indictment as “criminals of the highest order”?

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